Phantasy Friday: Samhain; Night of the Witch, Day of the Dead

For practicing witches, Samhain is a time for taking inventory of life and getting rid of weaknesses and what is no longer desired. A time of bonfires, the names of those passed on written on flash paper, offered to the flames in mourning or memory. A time of the altar draped in symbolic black, with white glittered sticks representative of frost and autumn leaves laid respectfully before the God symbol (Yes, God is in Wicca), a time of celebrating the harvest with blessed cakes and wine.

In other faiths, burial places are mown, cleaned and whitewashed in a yearly celebratory ritual. Some merely leave flowers or other tokens to show respect or appease the dead upon completion of the task; others long-burning candles, lit to flutter against the darkness, a field of glittering points of light illuming the night. Still other cultures make it a day of family frivolity, eating picnics from spread cloths among the newly beautified graves.

I’ve put together a quick compilation of other events and practices attached to Samhain and it’s celebrations. Hope you lovers of the paranormal find some useful tidbit to apply to your writing!

Samhain and the Wild Hunt
Samhain is the night of the Wild Hunt, when furious ghosts of the restless dead ride the sky on phantom horses with a pack of spectral hounds, shrieking and making wild noises. Nothing has been able to inspire terror like descriptions of flying black hounds and hell-fire hooved horses with hideous eyes. In the medieval versions, witches joined the phantoms, the ghostly train led by pagan goddesses-turned-devils (by Christianity), including Diana, Holda, Herodias, Hecate and Berchta.

A Cornish version of the Wild Hunt, Devil’s Dandy Dogs, is the most diabolical of ghostly packs, hunting the countryside for human souls. The Sluagh, or the Host, is a band of the unforgiven dead of the Highland fairy folk. Diana’s train punished the lazy and wicked but were generous on occasion: if a peasant left out food for them, they ate it and magically replenished it before they left.

A bit skeptical about the Wild Hunt? You may want to take into account that in the English countryside it was reported flying over the terrain as late as the 1940’s.

Samhain is a time when the Cowan may celebrate with the Witch.
The word Cowan is an old Scottish term for a mason who has learned the trade without serving an apprenticeship, and refers to a person who has not been initiated into the Craft. While Cowans may not attend circles, or Esbats, the regular meeting of covens where magical work is performed, they may be invited to seasonal festivals, Samhain, or All Hallows Eve, being one of them.

Crossroads and Samhain
Since antiquity, the junction of roads have carried magical significance. From the Greek goddess of witchcraft, Hecate, goddess of the crossroads, who had animals sacrificed to her there on Samhain to encourage her blessing; to Ireland and Wales, where it was traditional on Samhain, the Druidic New Year, to sit at a crossroads and listen for the howling wind, which prophesied the year to come.

Samhain and Fairy Rings
A Fairy Ring is a circle of natural mushroom fungus growth on grass and turf. Inedible –and animals tend to shun the circles– the mushrooms have reddish, buff or tawny caps. Here it’s said fairies and witches meet to dance in the night. In Britain, fairy rings are known as Hag Tracks, supposedly created by the dancing feet of witches.

Superstition attached to fairy rings says to stand in one on a full moon and make a wish, and that wish will come true. If one wishes to see and hear fairies, fairies being beyond the awareness of the five senses, one can run around a fairy ring nine times under a full moon and gain that ability.

However — it’s dangerous to do so on Samhain and Beltane (May Eve), the two major festivals of fairies. Fairies may take offense and carry the mortal off to Fairyland.

The Cailleach Bheur of the Highlands
On Samhain it’s said the Cailleach Bheur of the Highlands, a lean blue-faced hag, a supernatural remnant of the Celtic goddess of winter, is reborn — and returns to stone on Beltane’s Eve, April 30th.

Bells and Samhain
Bells share a connection between witch and Church. Both ring bells to drive away evil, the resonance of bells purported to carry such purity that nothing untoward can remain in its presence. In early history, Church bells were rung on Samhain night to drive away evil or any demons that may be hanging around Church entrances, as well as to prevent witches flying over villages or towns. It was believed the vibrations of pealing church bells would upset witches’ balance, causing them to fall from their brooms or the backs of demons they rode upon.

Witches also believe there is power in sound, and ring small bells during ceremonies to increase power. Larger bells are struck, rung or caused to ‘sing’ to dispel negative energy. Cleansing of any site where magic is worked is necessary to ensure ‘an it harm none’.

Mayhap this Samhain will come your invitation, and you’ll witness witches dancing deosil (pronounced jestle, clockwise) in a circle of blessing around a bonfire, blue and red flames leaping high against the black curtain of night. Stumble across sacred symbols scribed in the earth by a silver, sharp-tipped athame. Know the honeyed taste of blessed cakes washed down by the heady flavor of blessed white wine. Smell sweet incense and breathe the bite of sage, the smudge of protection, healing and blessing. Hear the bells, the delicate handheld tinkling intermingled with the bold brass and iron strikes of Crone and Church.

I left out touch, you say? Oh, no. I merely left it til last. Here’s hoping you don’t feel the cold wash of terror that precedes the raking claws of the sweeping, night-bound Wild Hunt as it boils across the sky this Samhain. May you never cringe from the burning, slashing, soul-searing green glow that radiates from the hideous eyes of the Wild Hunt’s thundering horses and baying packs.

I know; they’re the Old Gods, and rarely considered now beyond the historical significance of a scholar’s page. But they sustained our peoples’ ancestors for centuries. That alone should earn them a small tug of the forelock and a whispered prayer of respect on their night; Samhain.

Halloween is upon us, folks! Happy Haunting!

~Runere~

Visit Runere at www.RunereMcLain.com or friend her on Facebook at Runere McLain. Follow her on Twitter@RunereMcLain

Phantasy Friday: Season of the Witch; Healer or Halloween Horror?

“Star light, star bright,                                                  
First star I see tonight,
I wish I may, I wish I might,
Get the wish I wish tonight.”

Sound familiar? It’s one of the earliest taught rhymes in childhood. And if you’ve ever said it you could be accused of practicing Witchcraft.

Yes, this innocuous little saying is one of the oldest acquiring spells known to the Craft.  I guess familiarity does breed contempt. Or at least greater acceptance. But then maybe our Foremothers had the wisdom to use simple knowledge rhymes as a way to live in society, yet remain faithful to their creed to practice in secret.

Has your Mother ever slapped your hand down for pointing, hissing under her breath it was rude? Another leftover protection against being accused of Witchcraft. Most witches ground themselves to gather power, delivering the ‘intent’ to the selected recipient via direct stare and an extended forefinger. Pointing. Rude indeed in that context. (That stare is where the term ‘evil eye’ originates.)

Witches and their abilities have carried weight down through the centuries, but it has been the simple Herbalists who’ve gotten short shrift of the situation. Our own Rita Bay offered the observation during a program on herbs and healers, that there was often no distinction made between a healer and a witch. It stuck with me. Many a wise woman and herbalist was condemned as a witch for no more than her knowledge of what nature offers man as curative . . . or poison. If a plague or contagious illness appeared in a village, the herbalist was called upon to treat it. If members of higher society died despite her best efforts, their families’ grief often led to an accusation of witchcraft. Condemned, she was usually immediately killed as there were few trials, and those there were, mockeries of the real thing. The saddest part is the rest of the village sickened and died, and the popular consensus was she’d leveled a curse on the town with her death. If anyone was wise enough to realize the only person capable of helping contain the sickness had been foolishly executed, you can be sure they kept that opinion to themselves. To do anything else might end with them accused of being the witch’s cohort!

White Witch, Dark Witch, Green Witch, Solitary Witch, Solitary Hereditary,  Gardnerian, and on and on. There are probably as many types of Witch in  the Wiccan religion as there are factions in Christianity; and by that I mean Baptist, Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, Lutheran, Roman Catholic, and others. If I left anyone out of either group it wasn’t intentional, I just wanted to convey enough for understanding.

But this is the Halloween season, the time of ghosts, black cats and witches; cemeteries, hauntings and skittering bats.  Now I’m not saying anyone is afraid or anything . . . but when dealing with the unknown can one ever be too cautious? I’ve talked to a few friends and they’ve offered a few situational spells to share. Some to beckon, some to chase away. Whether you believe or not, I hope you have fun reading them!

In Summoning a Ghost:
(For conversation with the dead, attend to ceremony;
Avoid the grave’s annoyance, by speaking always gently.

Earth, bone,
 And winding sheet,
Let this spirit
 Come to me–
Yet send it
In peace,
Or not at all.

(If it come, it should be offered white wine, not red; and knelt to, from pity.)

To be said when passing a cemetery:

Knit your fingers, hold your breath,
Say to yourself this verse for death:

Keeper of bones
I know thy face,
But I shall yet
Outstrip they pace.

 

 

To protect against ghosts, demons, goblins or plain old criminal riffraff, here’s an inscription to be written over a doorway:

Who comes to me I keep,
Who goes from me I free
Yet against all I stand
Who carry not my key.

And after long hours spent trick or treating, of being caught up in the frightening illusions of the night, here’s a soothing spell to ensure little ones sleep free of nightmares!

Against Evil Dreams

The nightmare will toss its cold black mane
And gallop on ebony hoofs from your pillow, away
As far as the moon, if you will say:

Thou evil thing
Of darkness born,
Of tail and wing,
And snout and horn,
Fly from me
From now til morn.

Then think of the fire that burns by day:
Sun in his glistening chariot, Drawn by foam-white Stallions, out of the sea.

Just ten more days til Halloween! See you next week with a post on Samhain practices and rites!

~Runere~

Visit Runere at www.RunereMcLain.com or friend her on Facebook @Runere McLain. Follow her on Twitter@RunereMcLain

The Love of Writing

Hello everyone. Happy Dark Thursday. I love writing Paranormal Fantasy, and Sci-fi and along those lines. The creating process is an adventure in itself. I’m a panster, I write by the seat of my pants.  I’ve tried to write with a plot outline, but it only turns into scratch paper. My mentor Christine Feehan is the same way. First I’ll find a great name, and general idea and I begin. The story unravels as I write. Sometimes I might get an idea but it doesn’t mean the character’s listen sometimes they get a mind of their  own, or something will happen, and you’ll  just as surprised that it’s happening. I think that is awesome.

I can’t wait to be published, but I also don’t want it to stop there. I was fearful at one time thinking I might only have one story in me. Well, I found out that’s not true.  I have all kinds of characters in my head. It’s so exciting. It’s like being on a high, and your rushing to catch it because it feels so good.

I really miss not posting parts of a story. Ahh well, we can’t have everything, but I’ll fight to have as much of it as possible. Never give up your dreams. When you get them.. get a one.. Life moves in the positive.. and you’ll always get what you wish for.. by living it in your mind.

I love these pictures. The woman is awesome with her hair, and the dark lips. You can do so much with her. Enjoy.

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