Moonday’s Heroic Hunk in History: Lorenzo de’ Medici

La Primavera

Moonday’s Heroic Hunk in History is Lorenzo di Pierfrancesco de’ Medici (1463 – 1503) who was an Italian banker and politician. He belonged to the junior branch of the House of Medici of Florence. When his father died he was placed under the guardianship of Lorenzo the Magnificent, who was the ruler of Florence. His father had tried to protect him and his brother from the senior branch but Lorenzo forced them to make loans to him, which beggared the younger branch, and later only repaid half.

The younger Lorenzo received a great education and was a fellow student and friend of explorer and cartographer Amerigo Vespucci. Lorenzo grew up to be a poet and supporter of the arts with liberal views. In 1482 at 19 years old, Lorenzo was married to Semiramide Appiano whose family was a valuable commercial and political connection. Lorenzo the Magnificent may have commissioned Botticelli’s Allegory of Spring for the wedding with the younger Lorenzo as Mercury and Simiramide as the central Grace who is looking at Mercury or as Flora. He’s on the far left reaching up to pick an orange, a symbol of the Medici family.

He served as an ambassador to Paris but got into trouble with his older cousin and was removed from the roles of citizens of Florence eligible for public office until the older Lorenzo died in 1492. Shortly after his death, his son was overthrown and the Republic of Florence came into being. Lorenzo and his brother were prominent in the administration. He protected Botticelli, Michelangelo, Filippino Lippi, and Bartoloemo Scala from Savonarola’s destruction of the arts and artists. He refused to become the ruler of Florence when Savonarola himself was burned at the stake. His descendants in the younger branch of the Medici family became the ruler of Florence.

Check out my new group blog – Worlds of the Imagination, a group of fantasy/scifi writers  – where I’m writing about the new scifi program, Defiance.

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